If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is. Just ask Reebok. - Fordham Intellectual Property, Media & Entertainment Law Journal
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If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is. Just ask Reebok.

If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is. Just ask Reebok.

In response to FTC allegations that Reebok made false claims about the health benefits of its EasyTone shoes, Reebok has agreed to a $25 million settlement to refund purchasers.  Anyone who purchased a pair of EasyTone shoes beginning in December 2008 may now apply for a refund through the FTC.

Despite these allegations and this new settlement, Reebok still stands behind its shoes and the EasyTone technology.

Daniela Alvarado

Daniela Alvarado is a 3L at Fordham Law and IPLJ's very own Symposium Editor. She is an avid Central Park runner, enjoyer of West Coast sunshine, and internet troller. Daniela's note on the first sale doctrine was published in IPLJ Volume XXII Book 4. She hopes to one day pursue a career involving technology and the law.