New Copyright Law to Keep Cellphones Locked - Fordham Intellectual Property, Media & Entertainment Law Journal
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New Copyright Law to Keep Cellphones Locked

New Copyright Law to Keep Cellphones Locked

When purchased, a cellphone is “locked” into the network of the carrier through which it was bought.  In the past, cellphones have been “unlocked” by consumers so that they can work on any network–this has been useful for international travelers as well as people who just enjoy the freedom to choose a phone with whichever carrier they choose.  As of January 26, however, the Digital Millennium Copyright Act makes it illegal to unlock a cellphone.  Now, a consumer must ask the carrier for permission to unlock a cellphone, otherwise he is unlocking it at the risk of now violating copyright law.

Amory Minot

Amory Minot is a second-year student at Fordham Law School and a staff member of the Fordham Intellectual Property, Media & Entertainment Law Journal. She graduated from Trinity College in 2009 with a degree in Public Policy and Law. As a failed musician and a retired athlete, writing about it is her way to stay in the loop.