Proposed German law makes it easier to recover Nazi-looted art - Fordham Intellectual Property, Media & Entertainment Law Journal
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Proposed German law makes it easier to recover Nazi-looted art

Proposed German law makes it easier to recover Nazi-looted art

It’s fair to say that when Cornelius Gurlitt’s looted art stash was discovered last year in Munich, the world was shocked that such a huge trove could have gone unnoticed for so many years. Many were then dismayed to learn that German law preempted any lawsuits resulting from the discovery because of a strictly enforced thirty-year statute of limitations on claims.

Partly as a response, German legislators recently proposed a law, entitled Lex Gurlitt, that would lift the thirty-year statute of limitations and make it easier for Jewish heirs to claim Nazi-looted art, furniture, and other goods. While this law would not be retroactive, thus not affecting the Gurlitt find, it represents a good-faith step in the right direction.

Amy Mittelman

Amy Mittelman is a second year Fordham law student and a staff member on IPLJ. Her interest in IP traces all the way back to those nights when she pretended to be asleep, but was actually reading books under the covers with a flashlight. Prior to law school, Amy worked in publishing, where she could take her love of the written word out from under the covers and into the daytime.