How Justin Bieber Became the Public Face of Copyright Reform - Fordham Intellectual Property, Media & Entertainment Law Journal
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How Justin Bieber Became the Public Face of Copyright Reform

How Justin Bieber Became the Public Face of Copyright Reform

Bieber began his career on YouTube singing unauthorized cover versions of popular songs, and now he is being used as a mascot for the type of expression that might be banned under the proposed copyright reform act.  The Commercial Felony Streaming Act, or S.978, is a proposed bill that would make unauthorized Web streaming of copyrighted content a felony.  Which means artists like Justin Bieber or others who use YouTube could spend up to five years in jail.


(Image via FreeBieber.org )

In a bizarre twist of events, his management sent a cease and desist to the ‘Free Bieber’ campaign, arguing that celebrities should not be used as examples to promote causes without their permission, while Bieber himself said that the lawmakers responsible for copyright reform should be “locked up.”

And all this just when you thought Bieber fever couldn’t get any hotter…

 

Thanks to staffer Jonathan Brewer for the Washington Post link!

Adam Nelson

Adam S. Nelson is a 2013 J.D. candidate at Fordham Law with interests in digital intellectual property, telecom policy, and dispute resolution.