Nazi Looted Art - Fordham Intellectual Property, Media & Entertainment Law Journal
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Nazi Looted Art

Nazi Looted Art

Last year, German authorities found a stash of over 1,400 Nazi-looted artworks in a Munich apartment. The owner of the apartment is Cornelius Gurlitt, who is the son of one of Adolph Hitler’s personal art dealers. Despite popular conceptions of morality and justice, Gurlitt may get to keep the works under German law. He seems to have legally inherited the works from his father and, in Germany, the doctrine of adverse possession applies to artworks. Therefore, the statue of limitations has long passed for any rightful owner to bring a claim against Gurlitt. Naturally, the subject of the Holocaust and Nazi transgressions is inherently sensitive, especially in Germany, therefore it will be very interesting to see how the government handles this situation.

Clark Kosene

Clark Kosene is a second year student at Fordham University School of Law and a staff member of the Intellectual Property, Media and Entertainment Law Journal. His interest in IP stems from an unhealthy obsession with Indiana sports (which, thanks to Peyton Manning, is now more than just basketball). He also enjoys going to art museums with the hope that either some culture will rub off on him or, rather, that people will just give him the benefit of the doubt.